Funding our work

Thursday, November 17th, 2016 

Dear friends:

The work we’ve published in 2016 would not have been possible without two significant groups: our interns and our donors.  

Our interns — graduate students from American University and other schools around the country — research and report through our partnerships with The Washington Post, FRONTLINE and other major media. We are proud to count Workshop alums among the staff at the Post, NBC News, Politico, McClatchy, the Huffington Post, the Houston Chronicle, WNYC, Colorado Public Radio and Mother Jones, among many others.

Our funding — independent of the university, which provides office space and tech support —  comes from donors large and small. In 2016, that funding allowed us to examine fatal shootings by police and unwarranted evictions with the Post; ongoing housing problems more than three years after Hurricane Sandy with FRONTLINE; the difficulty victims face in prosecuting childhood sexual abuse as adults with Reveal News. We studied the growth of the many courageous nonprofit newsrooms overseas; analyzed eight years’ worth of banking data to get a clearer picture of the toll the recession took on every state; and relayed how Cuban media may finally be opening up to average citizens.

Thank you for helping to make these investigations a reality.  

Please consider making your donation this year on or by Nov. 29 — which is Giving Tuesday nationwide — to ensure that our stories in 2017 will be as impactful as they have been in the past; this year, a story we wrote led to a change in a law in Washington.

If you haven’t donated before, a contribution of any amount demonstrates your belief in independent journalism. And if you’re a continuing donor, please consider a recurring donation of $5 or $10 a month.

Your donations will allow us to continue this work and to train the next generation of great investigative reporters.

Thank you for your support,

Lynne Perri, Managing Editor

p.s.  All donations to the Investigative Reporting Workshop are tax-deductible.


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Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, teaming up with other news organizations. We recently aired "Blackout in Puerto Rico," a co-production of FRONTLINE, NPR and the Workshop. We also recently produced an IRW Interactive, "Nightmare Bacteria: Life Without Antibiotics," a compilation of several programs on antibiotic-resistance done with the FRONTLINE team based at the Workshop and the School of Communication.

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Over the years, we have teamed with msnbc and later NBC News online to produce our BankTracker series and stories on the economy. We also co-produced the first season of "Years of Living Dangerously," a documentary series and Emmy Award-winning program that aired on Showtime. Learn more on our partners page.

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