iLAB

Cross-pollination destinations

Nov. 23, 2010

Charles Lewis, founder of both the Investigative Reporting Workshop and the Center for Public Integrity, has traveled extensively since 2005 to speak on investigative journalism, new business models and the relationship between a free press and society to reporters, editors and publishers as well as academics.

Those travels have taken him to universities and professional organizations, startups and ongoing news conferences.

A look at where some of those lectures and presentations have taken place in recent years:

 

  • Oxford, England: University of Oxford Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism in England, "Charitable and Trust Ownership of News Organizations," Sept. 2010
  • Minneapolis, Minn.: Silha Lecture at University of Minnesota, October 2009
  • London: Centre for Investigative Journalism Summer School conference, July 2009
  • Tokyo: Journalism symposium, Waseda University, December 2009
  • Berkeley, Calif.: The third and fourth annual Logan Symposium, UC-Berkeley, April 2009, 2010
  • Newark, Del.: The University of Delaware, convocation for the College of Arts and Sciences, May 2009; also Contemporary issues in public administration, Graduate School of Urban Affairs, September 2007
  • Springfield, Ill.: “Government accountability and the free press,College of Public Affairs and Administration; and the Center for State Policy and Leadership, November 2007
  • Lillehammer, Norway: Global Investigative Journalism Conference, September 2008
  • Austin, Texas: Sixth Austin Forum, University of Texas, focus on investigative journalism in Latin America and the Caribbean, September 2008
  • Miami: IRE national conference showcase panel, “New directions for investigative journalism,” June 2008
  • Baton Rouge, La.: 2008 Breaux Symposium, New Models for News, LSU, April 2008
  • Chapel Hill, N.C.: Philip Meyer Symposium, “The Internet’s impact on journalism education and existing theories of mass communication,” March 2008
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina: Fifth annual FOPEA/Foro de Periodismo Argentino, November 2007
  • Cairo, Egypt: “How do democracies deal with corruption” conference co-sponsored by the American University of Cairo and The American University of Washington, D.C., November 2007; international conference on The changing role of the state: visions and experiences,” sponsored by the Ford Foundation, April 2005
  • Phoenix: “Keeping investigative journalism thriving,” IRE, June 2007• Toronto: Business models for independent investigative journalism, Global Investigative Journalism conference, May 2007
  • Atlanta: Access to Information: Conference preparatory meeting, the Carter Center, May 2007
  • Cambridge, Mass.: Goldsmith Awards Seminar, special citation for CPI, March 2007;presenter national security, secrecy and the news media, held for the deans of Harvard, Columbia, Northwestern, UC-Berkeley and USC, June 2006
  • Reno, Nev.: “Under Siege: Truth, Journalism and an Informed Citizenry,Fred W. Smith Ethics Seminar, University of Nevada, March 2007
  • London: keynote speaker, regional conference on investigative journalism, Centre for Investigative Journalism and City University, July 2006
  • Amherst, Mass.: Media Giraffe Project national conference, Can Free Media Sustain Democracy?” June 2006
  • Fort Worth, Texas: “The future of investigative journalism, nonprofits, blogs and corporations,” IRE, June 2006
  • Portsmouth, N.H.: New England Political Science Association annual meeting, May 2006
  • Indianapolis, Ind.: “Facts under siege, Freedom of Information summit, April 2006
  • Tonsberg, Norway: annual national conference on investigative journalism, March 2006
  • Rio de Janeiro: first international conference on investigative journalism of the Brazilian Association for Investigative Journalism, October 2005
  • La Paz, Bolivia: March 2005


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