Archives for February, 2013

Summer internship deadline nears

Posted: Feb. 15, 2013 | Tags: Workshop news

The Investigative Reporting Workshop, a professional news organization in the School of Communication at American University, is looking for smart, engaged students from around the country for summer internships.

Positions include researchers, videographers, graphic designers and web producers. Undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to apply. Preferred majors include journalism, communication, film, public policy, public health, history or economics.

The Workshop publishes in-depth stories about government and corporate accountability, ranging widely from the environment and health to national security and the economy. The Workshop pairs experienced professional reporters and editors with students and co-publishes with mainstream media partners as well ...

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The economy again takes center stage

Posted: Feb. 15, 2013 | Tags: economy

The national economy took center stage again this week with the president's State of the Union address, and reporter Michael Lawson uses Obama's call for a hike in the minimum wage to file a story on the increase in the number of working families who are still considered "working poor," according to government income thresholds. We also revisit our colleagues, Donald Barlett and James Steele, who have been writing about the economy — and, specifically, the intersection of Washington and Wall Street policies that have contributed to the nation's current plight. The two talk about their journalistic practices ...

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New programs, new ideas

Posted: Feb. 6, 2013 | Tags: Manufacturing, Sunlight Foundation, What Went Wrong

Reporter Michael Lawson, who continues to cover the economy for us as part of our “What Went Wrong” series, looks at the influence of innovative college engineering programs, and their potential impact on the growth of manufacturing in the country. 

Lawson also branched out of his comfort zone last weekend when he participated in a “data fest” at Columbia University. Journalists, computer programmers and math wizards worked in teams to see if they could find, compile, analyze and then make more easily accessible databases related to government and campaign finances. Michael wrote about the challenges and the thrill of this ...

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Recent Posts

TV viewership declines, diversity stalls in newsrooms

Revenue and audience trends for Hispanic- and black-oriented news outlets have mirrored closely the fluctuation of the industry overall, a recent Pew Research Center report found.


Survivors reflect on life after deadly bacterial infections

When FRONTLINE’s "Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria" premiered in 2013, Addie Rerecich and David Ricci were still struggling with the consequences of devastating antibiotic-resistant infections. Four years later, FRONTLINE and the Workshop caught up with the two survivors to find out how they were doing as part of an updated broadcast of the film tonight, July 25, 2017, nationwide on PBS. Check local listings.

Sinclair exemplifies consolidation concerns in TV news

Nearly 15 years ago, the five largest television companies owned about 180 of the country’s local news channels. Now, after years of dizzying buying sprees, mergers and billions of dollars spent, those companies own more than twice that — a pattern of consolidation that worries many, both within the industry and outside of it. 


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