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Stockman and the donors

April 2, 2018

Behind the ongoing federal lawsuit against former Texas Congressman Steve Stockman is a tale of failed business schemes and gun-lobby connections that have not been reported by media covering the breaking news of the trial. Larry Pratt, the gun lobby’s "secret weapon," urged businessman Dick Uihlein to spend big against then-Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn, deemed too soft on guns. So the top GOP contributor gave $450K to the candidate.

Shot and killed by police

Jan. 6, 2018

For the third year in a row, police nationwide shot and killed nearly 1,000 people, a grim annual tally that has persisted despite widespread public scrutiny of officers’ use of fatal force. And for a third consecutive year, The Post documented more than twice the number of deadly shootings by police that were recorded on average annually by the FBI.

In response to the shooting data compiled by The Post and others, the FBI in 2015 promised to start better information gathering about all police encounters that lead to deaths. This month, the agency said it will launch the new nationwide data collection system.

Still on the force

Dec. 22, 2017

Dozens of officers forced out of the New Orleans department over the past decade for misconduct who were given badges and guns by other departments, according to a Washington Post analysis of state and city employment records, police personnel files and court documents. At a time of increased scrutiny of police nationwide, the ease with which fired or forced out New Orleans officers found work at new departments underscores the broader challenge that law enforcement faces to rid itself of “bad apples.”

Fired Officers

Nov. 24, 2017

In another in an occasional series, The Washington Post and IRW explore how police chiefs are often forced to put hundreds of officers fired for misconduct back on the streets. This story looks at Gene Gibbons, who represents officers in job appeals on behalf of police unions across Florida, and who has, over the past eight years, won reinstatement for more than 22 fired officers, often returning them to work over the objections of police chiefs who say they are unfit for duty.

The Kangaroo Hunt

Nov. 21, 2017

Does hunting kangaroos for commercial use make sense? Australia’s kangaroo hunt supports a small but controversial industry of meat and leather products. The Investigative Reporting Workshop and National Geographic's Wildlife Watch co-reported and co-produced this special report.

The drug industry's triumph over the DEA

Oct. 19, 2017

Congress weakened the DEA’s ability to go after drug distributors, even as opioid-related deaths continue to rise, a Washington Post and "60 Minutes" investigation finds.

The New Americans

Aug. 28, 2017

Though the future of the federal refugee program has been put into question under Trump, last year’s influx of new arrivals to San Diego County — the third-highest on record since 1983 — could have a lasting impact on the region’s public schools. In this special report, we look at how San Diego is educating its refugee students, including what challenges remain and what it could mean for the future of the county.

Water: how clean, how safe, how much?

Aug. 16, 2017

As many as 63 million people — nearly a fifth of the country — from rural central California to the boroughs of New York City, were exposed to potentially unsafe water more than once during the past decade, according to a News21 investigation of 680,000 water quality and monitoring violations from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Fired Cops

Aug. 3, 2017

Since 2006, the nation's largest police departments have fired at least 1,881 officers for misconduct that betrayed the public's trust, from cheating on overtime to unjustified shootings. But The Washington Post has found that departments have been forced to reinstate more than 450 officers after appeals required by union contracts.

Police shootings

July 1, 2017

Police nationwide shot and killed 492 people in the first six months of this year, a number nearly identical to the count for the same period in each of the prior two years.

Fatal shootings by police in 2017 have so closely tracked last year’s numbers that on June 16, the tally was the same. Although the number of unarmed people killed by police dropped slightly, the overall pace for 2017 through Friday was on track to approach 1,000 killed for a third year in row.

Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

Cambodian government continues to clamp down on press freedoms

Cambodian voters head to their local polling places to cast votes for prime minister on July 29. There are a dizzying number of parties to choose from; one report counted 20 so far — all part of a façade of a free and fair election. 

Nonprofit media growth picks up

Why are foundations, individuals and now states pouring more money into the media? The answer is very simple. Without credible news and information, and thus a public that’s at least somewhat informed about the uses and abuses of power, a healthy democracy is not possible.


Blogs

Most Recent Posts

30,000 across from White House demand 'families belong together'

The Trump administration missed the first of two deadlines to reunite children separated from their parents. The action came after public backlash mounted, and a federal judge issued a nationwide injunction to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border within 30 days. More than 30,000 people rallied in Washington on June 30 to demand the Trump administration reunite families immediately.

Newspaper circulation plummets — again

Newspaper circulation plummeted again last year, following the trend of decreased distribution since the early 2000s, according to a new Pew Research Center report released Wednesday.

What we're reading: recent investigations from across the country

Latest investigations tackle immigration, crime and American's youth

Banks post record profits, but new bill may threaten community lenders

The U.S. banking industry reported record profits of $56 billion in the first quarter of 2018, an increase of more than 27 percent over the same time last year, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

Giving data journalism a second shot

Flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., for an internship was a nerve-racking way to start my year. But that jump for a data journalism internship with The Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University was the best choice I’ve made this year.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, teaming up with other news organizations. We recently aired "Blackout in Puerto Rico," a co-production of FRONTLINE, NPR and the Workshop. We also recently produced an IRW Interactive, "Nightmare Bacteria: Life Without Antibiotics," a compilation of several programs on antibiotic-resistance done with the FRONTLINE team based at the Workshop and the School of Communication.

Our graduate students are working as researchers and reporters with The Washington Post's investigative team. We recently published stories with the Post on Trump merchandise, police shootings and fired officers.

Over the years, we have teamed with msnbc and later NBC News online to produce our BankTracker series and stories on the economy. We also co-produced the first season of "Years of Living Dangerously," a documentary series and Emmy Award-winning program that aired on Showtime. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.